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What To Pack To Tide You Over Till The Movers Arrive

in Long-Distance moving, Preparing for a move by Wendy Gittleson Leave a comment
Image courtesy of Flickr.

Image courtesy of Flickr.

One of the most difficult parts of moving cross country is coordinating the timing. Unless you have a large home, it’s likely that your goods will share space with other shipments.

Don’t worry; movers take thorough inventories both loading and unloading, so things don’t get mixed up. What that does mean, though, is that because the moving truck has to make numerous stops and because semi trucks go slower than cars anyway, there will likely be a lag time between when you arrive at your new home and when the movers do. Yes, that will be an inconvenience, but one that will soon be forgotten and if you do it right, you can create some memories.

What you should pack will obviously depend on the amount of room you have in your car. If you are flying, you’ll obviously pack even less. If you are staying in a hotel room (generally recommended), you won’t need as many items as you would if you stay in your new home. Here are some packing ideas. Be sure to customize them to your situation.

1. Clothing – This one is obvious. Unless you have access to laundry, add a few days worth of clothing to the mover’s time estimate. It may not be the mover’s fault, but things do happen that delay shipments.

2. Toiletries – Again, this is obvious. If you are short on space, you can purchase soap, shampoo, toothpaste, sunscreen, etc. at your destination. I recommend bringing at least daytime makeup, however and a moisturizer. If you are moving to a dryer climate, bring lotion and lip balm.

3. Toys – There’s nothing worse than bored kids. Family games are a great way to pass the time, as is family reading time. Find the library in your new town. You probably won’t have a TV, but you will likely have smartphones and tablets, if the kids have them, are highly recommended. As far as actual toys, allow your kids their very favorite (if it’s small enough) but more than that can be too much.

4. Electronics – Smaller is better. Bring whatever you need for work and phones and tablets.

5. Pets – Bring your animals’ bowls and a couple of small toys for them. Don’t forget their leashes and collars. It’s also a good idea to travel with their veterinary records. I recommend crates for each of your pets along with their favorite beds.

6. Jewelry – Take all valuable jewelry with you, without exception.

7. Paperwork – Ditto on irreplaceable or difficult to replace paperwork. Bring everyone’s medical records, birth certificates, passports, car titles, etc.

8. Cleaning supplies – I don’t recommend moving your cleaning supplies unless you have a lot of room. They are generally too easy to replace. If you are staying in your new house, however, you might want to bring a vacuum.

9. Folding lawn furniture and inflatable beds – Again, for if you are staying in your new house.

10. Sleeping bags.

If you fear running out of room, the post office can be a great way to get some things to you faster.

 

 

How Does Apartment Moving Differ From House Moving?

in Uncategorized by Wendy Gittleson Leave a comment

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You live frugally or maybe you like the amenities of full-service condo living. Regardless of the reasons you chose apartment life, moving offers different challenges than does moving from a typical suburban home. What can you expect if you are moving in or out of an apartment or condo?

1. It might cost more – This is an unfortunate reality of apartment and condo living. Often, the parking situation is less than ideal, especially if you live on a narrow and steep San Francisco street. Some buildings have loading docks, which of course, is ideal, but most don’t. Once the truck is parked, movers will have to maneuver up and down stairs or wait for elevators. Depending on how many stairs are involved, expect one or two extra movers. They will work like an assembly line, ensuring that the move will happen as quickly as possible. In the end, extra movers won’t cost you more, but the extra steps involved may add to the time.

2. The building – Most condo and apartment buildings have strict rules when it comes to moving. Alert your management company of your moving date. You might need to reserve the elevator. You also might not be able to move on weekends or in the evenings, depending on the rules of the building. Elevator reservations tend to go fast, especially toward the end of the month and during the summer, so plan ahead. If your building has a loading dock or commercial parking, you will also need to alert management of that. Ask your mover, but typically, they will bring at least one 24 or 26 foot truck. If you are moving out of state, you might need to accommodate a 53 foot tractor trailer. Buildings that don’t have elevators tend not to have as many rules, but it’s better safe than sorry.

4. The city – We all know how awful parking is in San Francisco. Fortunately, the city will accommodate you, at a price. You can reserve parking spaces in advance, to allow space for your moving truck. They will give you temporary signs to put out.

Unfortunately, that’s not always enough. Small moving trucks – the type used for local moving – can usually maneuver through the city, but larger trucks – the type used for interstate moves, might not. With many movers, especially with major van lines, you might find yourself paying an additional fee for a small truck to move you out. The movers will then transfer your items to the larger truck for the interstate move.

While apartment and condo living offer conveniences that house living doesn’t, it definitely offers moving challenges. Plan well and you can help ensure that your moving day will go smoothly and as inexpensively as possible.

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