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Why Would I Store My Stuff With A Moving Company Instead Of A Storage Facility?

in Storage by Ninja Movers Leave a comment

As the price of real estate rises, especially in the Bay Area, people often find themselves with more stuff than they have room. Sure, purging is great, but do you really want to get rid of that dresser your grandfather finished for you or the 12 boxes of toys your children have grown out of but you know will want in the future?

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Of course, I’m oversimplifying the uses for storage. Sometimes people need temporary storage while they’re waiting for a home to be built or remodeled or they have had a flood or just a visiting relative and no where for them to sleep. Regardless of why you need storage, deciding what kind of storage can be another story.

The most obvious choices are typically the ones you are exposed to the most. Most of us can pinpoint a self storage facility (the type with lockers) within a few miles of our homes, and they are perfectly reasonable storage solutions — for certain people.

There is another option for storage, though. It’s called warehousing storage and it’s usually offered by moving companies like Ninja Movers. There are advantages and disadvantages to warehousing and to self storage. Here they are:

Pickup and Delivery — Most self storage facilities don’t have movers. Most moving companies will do all the heavy lifting, but there is generally a charge, but you will be hiring professional movers and often at a discount. If self storage facilities have pickup and delivery services, they will also charge, but they will likely to be better described as delivery people rather than professional movers. Moving companies will protect your goods, as well and the protection will stay on while in storage.

Advantage: Moving company

Accountability — With self storage, you rent the room. The storage facility will generally offer cameras and security, but if something happens, it’s all on you. With warehousing, the movers will take inventory and tag each and every item. Your items may not be stored together, but the warehouse personnel will be able to locate every item within minutes. No sorting through your goods to find the thing that’s (always) at the very back. Also, there is limited liability from the mover and you can always purchase more insurance. Insurance companies often prefer that you store with movers because there is always a clear chain of custody.

Advantage: Moving company

Accessibility — Self storage facilities sometimes have 24 hour access and warehouses rarely do. Most warehouses will not allow you to rifle through your goods, but they will be happy to help you out — sometimes at a charge.

Advantage: Self storage

Security — As I mentioned, movers’ warehouses don’t just hold customers’ goods, they hold everything that keeps the movers in business. It’s to their benefit to have the best security possible, which usually includes cameras and guards. Most self-storage facilities also have cameras and guards, but a person who’s clever enough who has a code to get in the facility could enter your room without detection. It’s rare that it happens, but it does on occasion. More importantly, you don’t know what’s being stored next to you. All storage facilities have rules against dangerous substances or contraband, but since storage customers are mostly left alone, they are difficult to enforce. With moving company storage, your household goods would be stored next to other household goods. Period.

Slight Advantage: Warehousing

To be realistic, most storage companies offer excellent security. Whether to choose self storage or warehouse storage completely depends on your needs. If you need to access your goods on a regular basis, go with self storage. If you want out of sight and out of mind for at least a while, then choose warehouse storage.

Featured image self storage via Wikimedia | Featured image warehouse storage via Pixabay.

What are the Best Storage Options for your Extra Stuff?

in Uncategorized by Wendy Gittleson Leave a comment

toomuchstuffHave you ever bought something, took it out of its meticulously packed box and failed to get it back in? Sometimes moving can feel a bit like that. In your old home, for the most part, there was a place for everything and everything had its place.

Your new home might even be bigger, but for some reason, you feel like you are putting square pegs in round holes. You just can’t get all your things to look – well – at home in your new home. You really don’t want to get rid of the table that your Grandfather refinished or the very first piece of furniture you bought together as a couple, but they just don’t work.

Perhaps you’re doing some renovations and you need to clear space. Maybe it’s time to convert the kid’s room to a home gym. Whatever the reason, having extra stuff is an American phenomenon – so much so that the acquisition of extra stuff and the storing of it has prompted a handful of reality TV programs.

As Americans’ need for storage has grown, so have their options for storing. While in the past you might have rented a nearby locker, adorned it with a padlock and called it a day, today, you can store your items in a warehouse or even in a portable container. Each of the individual storage options has their advantages, so how do you choose which one is right for you?

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1. Self Storage – Self storage, also known as “mini storage” is what most people think of when they think of storage. Essentially, with self storage, you are renting a room. You are responsible for moving your goods into storage, although you can use a mover. Some have garage-like doors and some have more conventional doors. Like when you are renting an apartment, the landlord is responsible for the general maintenance but is not responsible for your belongings. While most have some sort of security, it is up to you to provide a secure lock. Blankets and other types of furniture protection might or might not be offered by the storage facility, and if they do it will be at an extra cost. If anything is damaged while in storage, that’s also your responsibility. It is up to you to insure your items, although the storage facility might offer you insurance – at an additional cost. You pay based on the size of the room, no matter how much you have stored in the room. You will have access to your items anytime the facility is open.

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2. Warehouse Storage – Warehouse storage is not as well known as self storage, but for many, it’s a convenient option. Warehouse storage is typically run by moving companies. The moving company will move your things into storage and they will move them out. Everything will be professionally packed and will remain in that condition until you are ready to have them delivered. Every item is inventoried both before going into storage and after being delivered. Your items might be stored on shelves or in wooden crates. Since your items never leave the mover’s possession, they have more liability, although it is limited. In California, the liability is only $.60 per pound (that’s right – no matter how valuable an item, you are paid per pound). I’d advise that you still check into additional insurance. You are only charged for how much space you are actually using, so it can be less expensive than self storage. Access is typically given on appointment only and don’t expect to root around in your stuff. The warehouse employees will have to pull them out for you.

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3. Containerized Storage – A relative newcomer to the storage industry is containerized storage. In the last decade, it’s grown tremendously in popularity and for good reason. It offers flexibility that neither warehouse or self-storage can. Containers are brought to your home. You generally have three days to fill them. You can hire movers to fill them, if you wish. You have the option of keeping the container in your driveway indefinitely and for an additional cost, if your neighborhood allows. After the container is loaded, the storage company takes it to their warehouse or parking lot to be stored. You will need to purchase insurance for your items. Like with self storage, you are charged for the full size of the container, no matter how much space you are using. Access policies will vary from company to company.

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